This course is designed to introduce students to ways of using learning technology to enable creativity in the classroom or any learning environment. It takes both a theoretical and a practical approach to creativity. Therefore, students will read and study theories and empirical studies of creativity, create curriculum for learning environments, as well as work to expand their own creativity.
In this course, students will go behind the curtain of public education. Students will actively engage in making sense of the history, politics, promises and pitfalls of the US education system; a system in which most have participated in for 12+ years. Students will discover multiple and often competing purposes of schooling, examine important developments and trends in education using the latest available data, and consider the value of education in their own lives. Guest speakers, virtual field trips, contemporary texts, and community-based assignments enable students to explore such topics as school funding, special education, social justice, and other factors that influence equity and excellence in our nation's schools. (Gen. Ed. SB)
The course is designed to provide educators, counselors and mental health professionals with an overview of the important elements of leadership and of organizational behavior. Students will study, through the writings of leading theorists, the evolutionary process of leadership and organizational behavior from the start of the industrial revolution through the technical revolution of the 21st century. Organizations are complex social systems, sometimes effective and sometimes not. Students will have the opportunity to relate these theories to their membership in, successful or unsuccessful, organizations.
How is culture constructed through face-to-face interactions? How do race, language, and culture shape learning? What consequences exist for those differing from dominant norms? What evidence is there that participants are constructing interpretations, at times at odds with each other? What are the implications of this research for educators and diverse communities? In this course, we will survey how crosscultural communication has been researched, both for learning language and for examining its role in the academic progress of linguistically diverse learners.
Drawing on sociolinguistic, narrative and historical studies, we explore how sociocultural dimensions of bilingualism and biculturalism are researched. Also, sociopolitical theories are examined that account for historical responses to educating bilinguals.
How is culture constructed through face-to-face interactions? How do race, language, and culture shape learning? What consequences exist for those differing from dominant norms? What evidence is there that participants are constructing interpretations, at times at odds with each other? What are the implications of this research for educators and diverse communities? In this course, we will survey how crosscultural communication has been researched, both for learning language and for examining its role in the academic progress of linguistically diverse learners.