Drawing on sociolinguistic, narrative and historical studies, we explore how sociocultural dimensions of bilingualism and biculturalism are researched. Also, sociopolitical theories are examined that account for historical responses to educating bilinguals.
How is culture constructed through face-to-face interactions? How do race, language, and culture shape learning? What consequences exist for those differing from dominant norms? What evidence is there that participants are constructing interpretations, at times at odds with each other? What are the implications of this research for educators and diverse communities? In this course, we will survey how crosscultural communication has been researched, both for learning language and for examining its role in the academic progress of linguistically diverse learners.
Drawing on sociolinguistic, narrative and historical studies, we explore how sociocultural dimensions of bilingualism and biculturalism are researched. Also, sociopolitical theories are examined that account for historical responses to educating bilinguals.
How is culture constructed through face-to-face interactions? How do race, language, and culture shape learning? What consequences exist for those differing from dominant norms? What evidence is there that participants are constructing interpretations, at times at odds with each other? What are the implications of this research for educators and diverse communities? In this course, we will survey how crosscultural communication has been researched, both for learning language and for examining its role in the academic progress of linguistically diverse learners.
This course aims to prepare ELL and mainstream teachers to address the challenge of helping bilingual and emergent bilingual learners succeed in regular academic content classes. We will consider research supporting the view that second language acquisition is enhanced by rigorous academic content instruction.
The purpose of this course is to provide professionals in higher education with a foundational understanding of helping skills. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate basic helping skills; including active listening skills, nonverbal and verbal responses, dynamic empathetic and compassionate interactions. The focus of this course will also translate learned helping skills into the development of helping strategies and interventions to fit a variety of settings within higher education. It should be noted that this course is not meant to develop professional counseling skills, however, it is meant for higher education professionals to understand and demonstrate helping skills within an institutions context so that they can effectively perform their duties and responsibilities as helping professionals.
This course is designed to provide students with foundational knowledge in the area of abnormal child and adolescent psychology. Using a developmental approach to understanding psychopathology, the course seeks to understand the multiple transactional influences and the individual in context (social, cultural, life experiences) that influence child and adolescent development. Beginning with an overview of the field and foundational concepts, as well as the various factors that affect psychological development; the course will then examine the classification, assessment, and intervention of various diagnostic disorders (anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders, trauma and stressor related disorders, mood disorders, conduct disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, communication and learning disorders, intellectual disabilities, and autism).